Deleting A Site

I wanted to delete one of my sites on WordPress.com. I had set it up simply to see how the process of setting up a site had changed since the last time I had set one up.

I thought that I should go to Settings by going to the admin panel in the site and scrolling down to Settings/General and that I would see the option to delete the blog.

But no, the option to delete the site did not appear there. In fact, as I learned from Support that the place to go is this (substituting the name of your site for the words ‘yoursitename’, of course.

wordpress.com/settings/general/yoursitename.wordpress.com

I looked in the backend, wondering how I would have found this URL had I not asked Support – and I could not see a route in.

After deleting the site that I wanted to delete, I looked again at the Delete Site instruction page from WP.com at the following page and thought it might be out of date.

https://wordpress.com/support/delete-site/

So I raised it in the Support forum for the topic of the Unified Navigation, and received a nice reply that explained that the delete site instruction on the support page is not out of date, but because I have the advanced dashboard page setting on, I did not see the interface that is shown on the support page. I would have to disable the setting and then follow the instructions to delete the page.

Staff said that at the very least, they need to note on the support page that one needs to disable the setting in order to delete a site under one’s account, and thanked me for my input. That gave me a nice warm glow.

Unified Navigation

The Unified Navigation changes are a hot topic and a very hot and bothered topic.

Postcards – Please help us plan.

We are in the middle of deciding whether to market sets of postcards. We are thinking of five postcards to a set. Here are just two of the cards, to give you a flavour. Obviously, they would not be in the same set. There would be sets of flowers, sets of animals, etc.

As a very lame joke, if we put the Guinea Pig in the same set as the flowers, the Guinea Pig might eat the anemones and then we would only have stalks…

The postcards would be the ‘normal’ 6x4inch (15x10cm) size, printed on heavyweight card so that they feel as classy as they look. And the backs of the postcards would be a typical postcard layout.

I put the first fifteen postcards in a gallery on Flying Twigs, and you can see them by following this link to The Postcards

The link will open in a new tab.

The fifteen designs we have come up with is not a huge number, and before we get deeper into this, feedback will help us plan and we would be very grateful for any input, positive, negative, or anywhere in between.

Could you take a look and then let me/us know what you think of the designs?

Please add a comment here below on this site – Photographworks – (not on Flying Twigs because there is no comment area there.)

Victoria Crowned Pigeon Greeting Card

This is our Victoria Crowned Pigeon Greeting Card, and the bird is an exotic pigeon native to New Guinea.

This is our Victoria Crowned Pigeon Greeting Card, and the bird is an exotic pigeon native to New Guinea.

It walks at a casual and studied pace across the forest floor, with its steely blue colouring shading into the shimmering maroon and purple on its breast. And wherever it walks it carries its lace-like blue crest that vies for attention with its red iris.

It’s big for a pigeon, more than two feet from head to toe – 75cm in the less poetic metric measurement.

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