Stuff

I changed the theme of this site to Balasana. It was only after I chose and activated it that I saw that it is made by Automattic, the company that owns WordPress-dot-com.

Balasana is described as a clean and minimalist business theme designed with health and wellness-focused sites in mind.

Well, now it is going to serve me for this site.

I googled and found out that Balasana means Child’s Resting Pose, a kneeling pose in yoga. You kneel on the floor, put your head to the floor in front of you and hold your hands behind your heels. I am pretty sure I did this as a child.

Newsletter

I published issue #1 of my GetRevue newsletter. If you want to read it, it is here:

David’s Satisfying Newsletter #1

And if you want to sign up to get future issues, the link is at the top of the page here.

Jagadish Chandra Bose

Bust of Jagadish Chandra Bose in the grounds of Christ's College, Cambridge.

Bust of Jagadish Chandra Bose in the grounds of Christ’s College, Cambridge.

From Wikipedia

Sir Jagadish Chandra Bose 30 November 1858 – 23 November 1937, was a polymath, physicist, biologist, biophysicist, botanist and archaeologist, and an early writer of science fiction.

He pioneered the investigation of radio and microwave optics, made significant contributions to plant science, and laid the foundations of experimental science in the Indian subcontinent. IEEE named him one of the fathers of radio science.

Bose is considered the father of Bengali science fiction, and also invented the crescograph, a device for measuring the growth of plants. A crater on the moon has been named in his honour.

Born in Mymensingh, Bengal Presidency (present-day Bangladesh), during British governance of India, Bose graduated from St. Xavier’s College, Calcutta.

He went to the University of London to study medicine, but could not pursue studies in medicine because of health problems.

Instead, he conducted his research with the Nobel Laureate Lord Rayleigh at Christ’s College, Cambridge and returned to India.

The Approach

I came upon this bust from stage right, as it were, as you as looking at it. My instant thought was that the spectacles looked very odd on a copper bust. I thought it might be a temporary sculpture, perhaps plastic made to look like metal. Now I have got over that, I like it.

The Scream

This is not Munch’s The Scream. It is children screaming.

I met another screaming child today. He and his sister and parents were coming the other way and the screaming child was just beside himself with whatever was going on inside his head. He was half running half staggering, and screaming as he went. Really screaming. He was nearer to being afflicted rather than communicating, if that is possible.

I say ‘another’ screaming child because I am seeing more of them. In my mind’s eye I can hear someone say ‘In my day we’d have given them a clip around the earhole’. I picture a conservatively-dressed man saying it. He means that the modern world has its priorities mixed up.

In his view, parents don’t know how to control their children. The law says they can’t lay a finger on them: With corporal punishment forbidden, the parents are powerless. Just like the teachers in the schools.

And he means that the children are probably doped up on food additives and junk food. He means that the children are probably hooked on iPads and TV, while their parents have their noses in their phones all the time and don’t give the children enough attention.

This conservatively-dressed man of my imagination is of course part of me – part of my thinking. Except I would be more wise, more intelligent. I would know how to communicate with children like this.

Or would I? What if the child was truly inconsolable? What if it wasn’t a case of ‘relating’ to the child? What if the child, all these children, are victims of the times?

I started to think perhaps these screaming children are the canaries in the coal mine, so to speak, the sensitive ones – the ones who can detect that things are near breaking point, that society is stretched beyond comfort.

From there my mind played with what might happen – and this is where it led.

The Scream

He worked feverishly, stuffing newspaper and anything he could find up the chimney, around the cracks in the windows, around the edges of the door, in the letterbox.

Still the noise came in like a buzzing bee, like an angry wasp, like a high-pitched scream from a jet roaring overhead inches from him.

And still the screaming came in, vibrating through the very fabric of the building.

There was no way he could escape. In his sleep he heard it. He heard it when he was awake and distracted himself and thought for a few precious moments that he had blotted it out with his thoughts, but it seared into his ears, into his head.

He heard it when he was preparing meals – even down in the basement. He was trapped here and he heard it. No relief, non-stop, without pause.

He ran out of food and had to go out. Simple. Just go out.

He wrapped his head in towels, bound them with string and went out.

He saw them lying in the street. Some had crawled to the gutter and lay there. Some were still strapped in. He knew why they had been abandoned. Oh yes he could understand it.

Nobody could withstand that noise, not the incessant minute-after-minute noise that never stopped, It got into your ears, into your consciousness until you just had to try to get away, to abandon everything and run.

A mother had to be talked down off a roof because she was going crazy from the screaming. That went viral and that’s when people noticed it was not just here or there, not just in the UK – it was everywhere.

Young children started screaming. In their pushchairs, in car seats, in MacDonald’s, in Costa, in department stores, on the street.

They screamed and they were inconsolable. The could not be calmed down. They screamed themselves silly. They couldn’t stop.

He avoided them when he could and he told himself that knew what was wrong. He’d seen their mothers trying to placate them. They didn’t know how to control their children. That was it. The kids were probably doped up on junk food and additives. Kids were hooked on iPads and TV. Parents had their noses in their phones all the time and didn’t give the kids enough attention.

July was when it had all kicked off properly.

July 18, 2020 – The first day of the Scream. I saw a painting of it in the National Gallery.

It was scary. Kids everywhere, all over the world, all the kids, I mean all of them, screaming and screaming and screaming. News reports from Hong Kong to Naples – kids screaming. Some said that kids were the canaries in the coal mine, warning of doom. What doom?

Doctors were overwhelmed, sedatives didn’t work. Parents stopped loving their children. They ran away, leaving children in pushchairs and car seats and sitting at tables in MacDonald’s and Costa.

Children started dying, dying from screaming, dying from neglect. It was truly horrible.

And then it stopped.

They say it pulled the world back from the brink.

Personally I think it will all kick off again, and soon.

What Spider?

spider closeup
spider

Is it a Garden Spider Araneus diadematus?

I’d say body and head together measure about 15mm (2/3 of an inch).

It was (still is) on the compost bin in our front garden here in central Cambridge with a web stretching across to the black bin – a distance of about 15cm (six inches).

When I raised the lid on the green bin it walked sideways along the web and then back again as I lowered the lid on the bin.

Reply from a spider expert

What you have there is a Garden Spider (Araneus diadematus). You can recognise it by the diamond-shaped abdomen (hence the scientific name), the banded legs, and also those white dots on the dorsal area.  The colour of this species varies a lot which can lead to some confusion. They’re not dangerous, so you won’t need to move home.

Scientific name: Araneus diadematus
Size: Males up to 8mm, females up to 13mm
Distribution: Rare. Found throughout the UK
Months seen: June to October
Habitat: Found in hedgerows, woodlands and gardens
Food: Small invertebrates. Mostly flying insects which are caught in orb webs
Special features: Garden spiders are sometimes called Cross spiders on account of the white ‘+’ cross-shaped mark on the abdomen. They’re most frequently seen in September and October, when they reach adult size.
The females are usually seen upside-down in the centre of their circular webs, which they construct about a metre off the ground, in trees and hedges.
The colour of the abdomen is extremely variable. It can be anything from dark grey, through brown, orange, yellow to white. Usually at least five of the dots making up the cross marking are visible to some extent.
Garden Spiders lay their egg sacs on strong branches, fences, garden sheds or other structures in late summer and early autumn. The young spiderlings, which appear in spring and early summer look very different. Their bodies are bright yellow with a dark brown triangular patch on the abdomen.

WordPress.com Becomes Home.blog

A funny thing happened when I started what I thought was going to be a standard setup of a new WordPress blog. I expected it would be in the usual style of something dot wordpress dot com.

I started and chose the name Pangolin, and I could see that for the free option the URL would be https://pangolin.home.blog

Now I know that Automattic (the company that owns WordPress.com) bought the top level .blog domain a couple of years ago, but I never expected they would be using it to direct everything away from using the word WordPress on the front end. 

As I continued I could see that in the back end the URL was pangolinhome.wordpress.com.

Try typing that into the browser and you will it change to pangolin.home.blog

Is this just something they are experimenting with, or is it a permanent change for WordPress.com?

Follow-Up

I wondered what home.blog was, so I went visiting. It is the website of A3 – Appalachia + AGI + Automattic and in the About page it says:

Project A3 Goals

Building upon the ethos of WordPress — the open and collaborative technology platform co-founded in 2003 by Automattic CEO Matt Mullenweg at the age of 19 — Alliance Graphique Internationale design legends Marian Bantjes, Michael Bierut, Minchaya Chayosumrit, Yung-Chen Nieh, Alejandro Paul, Taku Satoh, Eddie Opara, Nancy Skolos have created visual designs for the web together with high school students in Paintsville, Kentucky and digital designers at Automattic in an all-remote collaboration that spans the world. The one-of-kind visual designs crafted by the AGI designers center around themes that include Home, Art, Photo, Science, Code, Poetry, Water, and Music as presented on the dedicated websites Home.blog, Art.blog, Photo.blog, Science.blog, Code.blog, Poetry.blog, Water.blog, Music.blog as permanent symbols on the Internet of digital creativity. From these websites, anyone can create a blog as a free subdomain like: laura.science.blog or philippe.code.blog, etc.

(My emphasis – text made bold)

At the bottom of the page it said to click to start a home.blog so I clicked to start a blog and found myself back where I was when I had started hours earlier to create a new blog.

Only this time as I was going through the process I clicked on ‘alternative -something or other’ (can’t recall exactly what it said) and I typed in some vaguely random words. And before I knew it I had created SearchDotPress which is searchdotpress dot wordpress dot com

So by accident I had managed to make a site with an address that was wordpress dot com rather than something or other dot blog.

This is getting out of hand and about as confusing as heck.

Cows On Midsummer Common

Closeup of cow on Midsummer Common

If you have looked at my photos of the cows on Midsummer Common here in Cambridge, you probably don’t realise how close to the houses the cows can be. So this is to correct that.

Of course, I didn’t shoo the cows over there. They just happened to be at this side of the Common. I singled this one out because it caught the rays of the sun so well. That chestnut brown is wonderful, isn’t it.

In case you think this is way out in the countryside, this is less than 500 yards as the crow flies from the centre of Cambridge.

Cow on Midsummer Common

Newsletter

I signed up to Revue. The home page of Revue says it “is an editorial newsletter tool for writers and publishers.”

I am, in the vernacular of British English, ‘giving it a go’.

To give something a go means to try something without high hopes of success or attachment to the result. It is a way of disarming the risk of failure.

My aim is to build a huge following – for what purpose? It might help to first have a purpose (beyond the adulation of the masses).

That’s for the bright future. For now I would like to get a few subscribers for David’s Satisfying Newsletter, so if you are in the mood…

Click here to sign up