Black And White Sunday Composition

pw-black-and-white-composition

I just saw a post with a single black-and-white image from Cardinal Guzman. He named it B&W Sunday: Lysebotn, and it’s a very striking image that I recommend you go take a look at.

He linked to another site where Paula is coordinating images under themes, and today, Sunday, the theme is black-and-white compositions, and this is my contribution.

Through the cleverness of WordPress I have also set this image as the featured image for this post. If you want to see the photo in this post at larger size, click the image in the post and it will open in a new window or tab.

If you go to the main page of this site, you will see that the header image is quite different. It is a panorama taken with my iPhone a few weeks ago and it is a sweeping image across the garden of the cafe in front of the Queen’s Palace at Holyrood here in Edinburgh.

I must go on a tour of the palace and photograph inside the Palace gardens.

About This Photo

The small, stone building in the foreground is an outhouse in the grounds of a hospital on the outskirts of Edinburgh, and in the background are the Pentland Hills.

Here is the colour of the stone before converting to black and white:

wall

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12 thoughts on “Black And White Sunday Composition

  1. Pingback: Black & White Sunday: Composition | Lost in Translation

  2. vanglo48

    I liked waking up to this on my Sunday morning. There’s something more textural to Black and White. Framed well being a tad off center with the hills creating a good depth. Nicely done.

    Like

    1. Thank you for your nice comment. I agree about Black and White photos. I just went to see a retrospective of Harry Benson and the recent colour photos just don’t evoke the same desire to wander around in the tones of the images like the earlier ones do.

      Like

  3. I love this photo-the black and white really brings out the textures of the building materials-it also made me think how buildings can be a place out of time-I used to survey historic buildings and in the rural areas particularly, those buildings could just be haunting-this evokes the same kinds of feelings-well done!

    Like

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