Misty In Cambridge This Morning

Not only was it misty, someone had gone around and edged the leaves in white and put little dots of white along the veins of the leaves.

Which reminds me of a poem, half remembered that I wrote when I was about fifteen. My parents, grandparents and I would go out in the car. We lived a long way from the countryside, and really it would not have made much difference had we been nearer. You could drive in the countryside and you could get out in a lay-by and eat sandwiches and drink tea from a flask. But you couldn’t get into the countryside, not really into it. This is England: You couldn’t and you cannot just get out and walk.

Well, you could if you went to a National Park, but they don’t grow on trees. So I wrote this poem that was odd really because I am not sure exactly what it was speaking to. I don’t remember the whole poem, but it was a series of records of things you could see in the countryside, in nature. I remember the very end of the poem because of the last two lines.

So imagine the poem started with a line about what you could see. Then there was a list of things, and then the penultimate line, the last in the list of things you could see, was something like ‘the veins on a leaf caught in the sunlight’, and then the last line.

So the poem went something like this:

You can see
….
….
The veins on a leaf caught in the sunlight
But not through a car window.

6 Comments

  1. Tamara says:

    A poignant photo and memory, David, and the last line of your poem is especially moving. 😢

    Like

    1. Thanks. Somewhere in storage is a photo of my parents sitting on folding chairs on a grass verge, by the car, with a blanket laid out and food and a flask of tea, or something like that.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. LOVE hoarfrost, but especially capturing hoarfrost: ) Thank you David!
    Hmm… By leaf shape, this looks like it might be Motherwort but by the colour of stem(canes?) might also be Raspberries… Close on either?

    Like

    1. Ah, it was just something that caught my eye because of the singular way the frost had touched it. As to what it is, your guess is as good as mine, and probably much better!

      Liked by 1 person

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