Memories Of Sun

memories of sun on trees and grass

13 Comments

  1. Tamara says:

    Great title, David — and thanks for bringing back my memories of our sunny times together too!

    Winter that is now upon us does have its lovely sides too, yes? I think blinding white blankets of snow are also mighty grand. ❄️

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    1. I was driven to the image of summer because of the unremitting dreary days. No blinding white blankets here.

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      1. Tamara says:

        Yes, that’s true about no blinding snow blankets here. Memories of snow from living in other countries and climates.

        Essentially I meant enjoying the seasons, and we do get a good number of sunny days here throughout the year.

        When we were in Spain, people were also complaining that many areas were having hot summer weather for nine months a year now.

        Two people commented to me that they had had rain only twice in many months, and crops were in trouble.

        This is a reality to consider too – though that is a statement about climate change, as those people were also saying.

        It’s hard to get a balance these days it seems.

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        1. Yes – we do get sun here and snow is nice. I tell you – we were all meant to be nomads 🙂

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  2. Is she a Beech, David; the lovely smooth-skinned Beauty in your photo?

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    1. The leaves look like Sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) but I wanted to go back to the original photo to check that I wasn’t seeing the leaves of another tree overhanging this one. It took me an age to find the original photo in my digital library, until the penny dropped and I recalled with which camera I took the photograph – hence the delay in replying. The bottom line is that I have looked all over the image at 200% magnification and I can’t see any beech leaves. There is a whorl on the trunk that’s characteristic of beech, but I think the tree must be a young sycamore.

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  3. Mm, not sure if WordPress has eaten another comment or you’ve not seen it yet… Let me know if it’s gone missing, would you please?

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    1. See other reply 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Thanks David – no worries about the time passing – I’ve never had the opportunity to see a Sycamore (young or otherwise; ) but the Acer designation explains the similarity of the leaves to what I recognise as a type of Maple…
    I’m thinking that the young Sycamore you mention is actually “hugging” (and under-hanging) the smooth-trunked monster that I’m inquiring about… If it is indeed a Beech it’s quite within the realm of possibility that you wouldn’t necessarily be able to see either branch or leaf of a tree that size within the frame of your photo; ) I knew a Beech of that vintage many years ago and her branches (and leaves; ) were far, FAR above my head. (It’s been a long time since she succumbed, but I still miss that tree… ):

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  5. After having looked up your Sycamore (aka Plane Tree, which I had only heard of in books… books about Britain, I believe: ) but apparently they do well as an understory tree so would definitely fit right in with an elder Beech: )
    http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Acer+pseudoplatanus

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  6. I have never had the pleasure of seeing a sycamore either. As soon as I read the word, I associated to some song with Mary Black … don’t remember which one, so I must go and google that now. 🙂

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    1. I didn’t know that. For some reason – my ignorance 🙂 – I thought Sycamores (Acer pseudoplatanus) were found all over the world – at least in the temperate latitudes.

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      1. No, not here … perhaps farther south.

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