Same As It Ever Was

“Students ended occupation of the ROTC building at Central Michigan University at Mount Pleasant and started meeting with faculty members to discuss plans for “peace week” this week. National Guardsmen were withdrawn from the University of New Mexico late Friday after a confrontation with students that sent 11 people to the hospital with bayonet wounds. 

This was reported in the San Bernadino Sun 10th May 1970

I learned of the bayoneting and found the news coverage just yesterday while looking at a post on ComicsGrinder. Henry Chamberlain wrote a post reviewing Kent State: Four Dead in Ohio. by Derf Backderf, a graphic novel on the protests at Kent State.

“On May 4, 1970 on the campus of Kent State University, four students were killed and nine others were injured when Ohio National Guard members opened fire on demonstrators protesting the Guard’s presence and the expansion of the Vietnam War.

The extract from the graphic novel included a frame showing a student being bayoneted while trying to escape through a window into a building. There she was half in and half out, being bayoneted.

How could it happen that National Guardsmen would stab students with bayonets?

And while doing that I came across this, a story that didn’t make the international news, about a predominantly black college:

“On May 15, 1970, two students were killed and 12 were wounded when police fired more than 100 rounds at protesters at Jackson State College in Mississippi.

And the reason I entitled this piece Same As It Ever Was, was because of this piece, also in the same issue of the San Bernardino Sun:

“The most serious situation developed about 11 p.m. EDT at the GWU campus, about half a mile west of the White House. A barricade of an overturned small truck, benches and other objects was set up at a busy intersection on the edge of the campus. When protesters started pelting police cars with rocks and bottles, officials responded with a heavy tear gas attack in one of the rare uses yesterday of the gas. The students, estimated at about 200, retreated into the campus, whose streets were full of others students and protesters followed by Civil Defense Unit policemen.

By the Brexit Emergency Powers Act 2022

A proclamation by the Brexit Emergency Powers Act 2022 with text "Whereas the common population of this sceptered isle was attached to answer the Lords Farage of a plea why they refused to serve — whereas it is ordained that any man and woman of the Queens’s realm of England, being able of body and below the age of sixty years, not living by trade or practising any specific mystery or having his own land about the tilling of which he can occupy himself, not being a servant to another, if he should be required to serve in a service considered fitting to his estate, shall be bound to serve him who so requests and shall take only the wages, liveries, rewards, or salaries which were in force, in the place where he should serve, in the sixty-fourth year of her Gracious Majesty or the average in the five or six preceding years. — Now the said common population was found guilty as charged, are required to till in the fields and raise crops from the earth as villeins nativus and shall to their home church by Tuesday 7 June for service, at the failiing of which to take the stocks for three days and thereafter be imprisoned."

A Proclamation

Whereas the common population of this sceptered isle was attached to answer the Lords Farage of a plea why they refused to serve — whereas it is ordained that any man and woman of the Queens’s realm of England, being able of body and below the age of sixty years, not living by trade or practising any specific mystery or having his own land about the tilling of which he can occupy himself, not being a servant to another, if he should be required to serve in a service considered fitting to his estate, shall be bound to serve him who so requests and shall take only the wages, liveries, rewards, or salaries which were in force, in the place where he should serve, in the sixty-fourth year of her Gracious Majesty or the average in the five or six preceding years. — Now the said common population was found guilty as charged, are required to till in the fields and raise crops from the earth as villeins nativus and shall to their home church by Tuesday 7 June for service, at the failiing of which to take the stocks for three days and thereafter be imprisoned.

Explanation

I based it on a text from a proclamation from the Middle Ages when most tenants were under some kind of mutual obligation with the landlord and not free to come and go and be tenants of whomsoever they pleased and in the period of disruption during the black death some tenants were arguing that they were freed from their obligation and so the Lords took them to court and the proclamation was that they were bound and they had to work in the Lord’s fields.

Lounging Back

This painting is in the National Portrait Gallery in London. I was there a couple of days ago and immediately thought of the long tradition of lounging on the benches.

That was before I read the description to the painting that refers to the very word ‘lounging’ where it says”:

“a rare and informal view of…. lounging back on one of the green front benches in the House of Commons..”

That caused me to chuckle as I thought of Jacob Rees-Mogg (see below).

Here is the full description of the painting:

JOE CHAMBERLAIN and ARTHUR JAMES BALFOUR, 1st EARL OF BALFOUR
A rare and informal view of two great statesmen, lounging back on one of the green front benches in the House of Commons, evidently taking part in a debate. Chamberlain (1836-1914),the MP for Birmingham, had deserted the Liberal Party over the issue of Irish Home Rule. He joined the Conservative government in 1895 as Secretary of State for the Colonies. Balfour (1848—1930) became leader of the Tories and succeeded his uncle Lord Salisbury as Prime Minister in 1902.

Painting by Sydney Prior Hall (1842-1922)
Oil on canvas, c.1895

There’s Lounging And Then There’s Lounging

As the newspapers reported last September:

A prominent pro-Brexit politician sparked outrage — and a meme — Tuesday when he stretched out across a bench in Parliament, appearing bored as British lawmakers heatedly debated the country’s exit from the European Union.

Jacob Rees-Mogg, the Conservative leader of the House of Commons known for his aristocratic mannerisms, sprawled himself out in the front row of Parliament on Tuesday night, spurring some lawmakers to shout “Sit up, man!”

Anna Turley, a Labour MP, called Rees-Mogg’s posture “the physical embodiment of arrogance, entitlement, disrespect and contempt for our parliament.”

The Labour MP Anna Turley took this photograph of Rees-Mogg.

Jacob Rees-Mogg Today

More or less since that incident, Jacob Rees-Mogg has been very quiet and has kept out of the limelight.

As of today, Jacob Rees-Mogg is Leader of the House of Commons and Lord President of the Council.

Wikipedia describes the functions of the Leader of the House and of the Lord President of the Council:

The Leader of the House of Commons is generally a member of the Cabinet of the United Kingdom who is responsible for arranging government business in the House of Commons.

The Lord President of the Council is the fourth of the Great Officers of State of the United Kingdom, ranking below the Lord High Treasurer but above the Lord Privy Seal. The Lord President usually attends and is responsible for presiding over meetings of the Privy Council, presenting business for the monarch’s approval. In the modern era, the holder is by convention always a member of one of the Houses of Parliament, and the office is normally a Cabinet post.

The Field Upon Which The Knights Shall Joust

We shall see how it all plays out in the current mood of the Government seeking to curtail the powers of the Supreme Court. I imagine the Privy Council will have a part to play in the constitutional tussle.

Technical note

Just in case anyone is feeling sympathetic to the effort I took to type out the fulling description of the text that accompanied the painting, I didn’t actually do that.

In the gallery I took the photograph of the description with my iPhone. I then cropped it to show just the text and put it into Picatext, an application for Mac OS that extracts ASCII text from JPEGs.

That way I didn’t have to copy and type out the description, just copy and paste.