Month: July 2012

Instagram Applications

I just wrote about nine Instagram applications that I have come across. Two of them are plugins for self-hosted WordPress sites, so I wrote about the applications on my self-hosted site at Photographworks. Update My self-hosted site was hacked so I rebuilt it, and the Instagram review is no longer there. It was my fault for getting hacked. I uploaded a dodgy theme and caused myself the grief. Newly rebuilt site   Meanwhile, the sheep gets a look-in: But this still applies to the comments here:

I Have Been A Bit Distracted By..

We are having a new site built for us from which to sell greeting cards. It has taken up a bit of time and energy – but I believe in what we are doing, so my energy level is high. The bottom line – watch this space… Meanwhile- Dogs! We saw these dogs at the Royal Edinburgh Show. Their trainer was getting them to sit, and their eyes followed her as she moved about. Then as time wore on, they started to lose concentration. I managed to take a few shots and this is one where they were starting to revert to waywardness…

D.C. Police: Photography Is Not a Crime

This is from an article in Reason Last week, two years after Washington, D.C., cops told Jerome Vorus to stop taking pictures of a traffic stop in Georgetown and to stop recording his encounter with them, the Metropolitan Police Department issued a general order against such illegal interference with citizens’ exercise of their First Amendment rights. The order (PDF), part of an agreement settling a federal lawsuit Vorus filed last year with help from the American Civil Liberties Union of the Nation’s Capital, “recognizes that members of the general public have a First Amendment right to video record, photograph, and/or audio record MPD members while MPD members are conducting official business or while acting in an official capacity in any public space, unless such recordings interfere with police activity.” Contrast the situation with that in the UK, where there is specific legislation limiting the rights of individuals to photograph policemen, members, of the armed forces, and others: Photographing In Public Places And The Preservation Of Democracy