Month: July 2008

Nikon P5100 image formats

I was playing about with the image-size options on the Nikon P5100 yesterday and took a couple of shots with the image parameters set to produce a 16:9 aspect ratio image. The pixel dimensions are 3968×2232 (8,856,576 pixels) as against the 4000×3000 (12,000,000 pixels) 4:3 aspect ratio, maximum image size of the camera. I like the 16:9 letterbox format. I think, however, that the square format is my favourite format, and the Nikon P5100 offers that as well at 2992×2992 pixels. And it also offers a 3:2 format at 3984×2656 pixels (10,581,584 pixels), which means I can keep to the same format as my Nikon D200 if I wish. Ah yes, choice. One of the problems with choice is not remembering to change the settings. Which is what happened today when I took a shot of some furniture. As it happened, the format probably suited the shot, but it was not until I opened the shot in Photoshop that I noticed the format was not square, nor 4:3, nor 3:2, but the long letterbox shape …

Composite shots with the NIKON P5100

One of the nice things you can do with the P5100 is choose from a list of image sizes, from the largest 4000×3000 pixels down to 1 megapixel and beyond (for TV) as well as square format and 16:9 letterbox format. The square format appeals to me, as does the ability to put a black keyline around the shot after it has been taken. It looks very attractive. But the appeal of smaller image sizes comes into its own with composite shots. Composite shots – called Photomerge in Photoshop, are made by taking a number of shots dotted around a large subject, making sure to cover every part of it and even beyond its boundaries, and then using the photomerge function in Photoshop (file > automate > photomerge) to merge them into one composite image. And therein lies the potential for a problem. Because if I take twenty shots of a building and each shot is 12 megapixels, and then ask Photoshop to merge them and blend them into one image, well that is a …

Auto Color in Photoshop CS3

If you haven’t clicked on Auto levels or Auto Color in Photoshop CS3 when you are processing images then I recommend you do. When I am processing shots in Photoshop CS3 I often click on Auto Levels or Auto Color (Image > Adjust > Auto Color) to see that the effect is, and quite often I’m surprised at the result Auto Color produces. It’s not a question of whether I like the result but rather, than I am surprised at what a powerful tool it is. It reminds me of the color recovery capabilities in scanning old, faded color photographs. The results are often nothing short of amazing. I clicked on Auto Color when I was processing this shot, but it took all the yellow out of the background I had carefully put in, and whilst it opened up the shot, it was not what I was looking for. This shot of irises is pasted over a shot of a sheet of art paper I had soaked in coffee and let dry. I am building …